Sunday, 16 July 2017

Sunday Stitch School: Lesson 29 - Madam Totsuka's Loop Stitch

Welcome to the Library at Sunday Stitch School.
Today I want you to have a look at another of Madam Sadako Totsuka's books: Totsuka Embroidery Stitch Book 12.

This book is devoted to the Loop Stitch and the Rosetta Stitch and a lot of arrangements.

A stitch called Loop Stitch (also known as Detached Chain Stitch or Knotted Loop Stitch) can be found in other stitch dictionaries.

Today's stitch is a different one all together. To keep them apart, I will give it the nickname of  Madam Totsuka's Loop Stitch. It is a version of the Chain Stitch.

To work it successfully you need plain weave fabric, a needle with a sharp tip and a thread that can be split:

Come out of the fabric and pierce the thread where it came out.

 Take the needle out a step below and place the thread underneath the needle.

 Insert the needle at the start, again piercing the thread.

 When you pull through, a loop is formed and anchored firmly.

 It should stand up like this
This is the basic Madam Totsuka's Loop Stitch.

To make a line, take the needle out at the bottom of that straight stitch, and repeat in the same way, making sure the loops are anchored firmly.



After a while you will have a line of loopy loops.

Your homework
will be to work
1) a line on the Aida sampler. Use a sharp tipped needle and fix the stitches securely as Aida is not really a suitable fabric to work on.

2) also work some free form embroidery on this scrap of batik.
 
I hope you will enjoy this 'new' stitch. Should you have seen it before and have a name for it, please let me know.


28 comments:

  1. Bonjour, je suis toujours très impatiente de voir le point de la semaine et jamais déçue, c'est un vrai plaisir,
    maintenant je pars à la recherche du nom en français
    Encore merci
    Mattia

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. I thought this stitch would be a new challenge. No name in Swedish unless I make a translation....
      (Mattia said: Hello, I am always very impatient to see the point of the week and never disappointed, it is a real pleasure,
      Now I go in search of the name in French
      Thanks again)

      Delete
  2. That's a very intriguing stitch - I've never seen it before. It would make an unusual texture...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Like other loopy stitches it can be used for plants or hair or just something strange... I am still planning how to use it för the free form homework.

      Delete
  3. It's a stitch I've never done. I shall have to add it to my list of 'to do's'

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As it is basically a Chain Stitch where you don't fix the loop, it is easy to do. I think it has a lot of possibilities.

      Delete
  4. Replies
    1. Yes, isn't it. It is easy to alter the size of the loops, too.

      Delete
  5. another new stitch to me liking how it stands up so well

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There must be a way to fix it flat to the fabric without being anchored in the way the ordinary Chain Stitch is. I will have to give that 'a good think'!

      Delete
  6. An interesting stitch, one that I haven't come across before

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have never seen it sewn anywhere, so it was a real discovery when I saw it in the book.

      Delete
  7. This stitch is new to me. I like it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Have you seen any of Madam Totsuka's embroidery books in the bookshops? If you have time, go and have a look.

      Delete
  8. Such a different stitch! I think it would be a great stitch to make hair or fur.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, and if you use your fingers to keep the loop steady you can make the loop very large even if the straight stitch is short. Many possibilities!

      Delete
  9. I've never seen this stitch before, I must try it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's easy and fun! I hope you will enjoy it.

      Delete
  10. I've seen that stitch before, I agree it would be good for a fur or hair effect.
    I have an old embroidery booklet by a Scandinavian woman published by Sunset and that stitch is in there. The booklet is now in storage in another state so I can't pull it out for more details. Well done, Queenie.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is good news. Please when you do pull out that book, let me know more! I am VERY interested!

      Delete
  11. I haven't seen that stitch before, it must be hard to keep the loop the same size for each one. I like it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You have to eyeball the length of the loop, or just enjoy the floppy free form.

      Delete
  12. This looks promising. It would be great close together as a flower center. Also as the stitch is well secured, it could be snipped.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When I worked the free form embroidery (tomorrow's homework) I did use it for flowers and you are absolutely right.

      Delete
  13. What an unusual stitch. Can't wait to try it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Do give it a try. It is good for flowers or plants.

      Delete
  14. this is a new stitch. never seen it before. looks interesting.

    ReplyDelete

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